Chart Paper, Post-its and Formative Assessment - Room 213

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Chart Paper, Post-its and Formative Assessment

Those of you who follow me know I have a thing for chart paper and post-it notes. Nothing has changed.  Last week I did an exercise that allowed me to give my students fast feedback in a way that was much more enjoyable than them writing another essay that I would have to mark.  They will be writing an essay soon, but this activity will hopefully make it a less painful process for the writers and for me, the reader.

The students came to class having read a chunk of Pride & Prejudice.  I had told them to take good notes on the character development of Collins and Wickham.  When they came in the door, I gave each student a handful of post-it notes (two different colours). I told them to take a few minutes to transfer points from their notes to the stickies.  Read on to see what happened next:

Formative assessment activities get students thinking and learning, with less marking for you
Formative assessment activities get students thinking and learning, with less marking for you
Formative assessment activities get students thinking and learning, with less marking for you
Formative assessment activities get students thinking and learning, with less marking for youFormative assessment activities get students thinking and learning, with less marking for you

An effective formative tool:
When they had finished the activity, every student had more practice in collecting evidence, organizing ideas and staying focused. It took seventy-five minutes, and I truly believe they got more out of it than if I had taken in an assignment and given them the feedback a week later. Now don't get me wrong: those finished assignments are very important. I'm just saying there are multiple ways to get them to learn how to write about literature that allows us to have a life too!

Check out Active Reading with Post-it Notes for more ideas for using this tool. You can also find more formative assessment ideas in my Formative Assessment Power Pack, as well as on my Pinterest board:

Follow Room 213's board Formative Assessment Ideas on Pinterest.





6 comments

  1. Do you have any formative assessment tips or tricks?

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  2. This was a brilliant activity. I am sure your students loved it and learned a lot.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Charlene. I know they always like the chance to get out of their seats and to work together. I hope they learned something!

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  3. I will be sharing this post with my students to demonstrate the many different ways of using their post-its to track their thinking. Thanks so much!

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    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Tracey. Good luck!

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  4. You can learn how to start a rhetorical analysis essay, because all we know that good start is a half of any business.

    ReplyDelete

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